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VGW Scribble: Customer Abuse

scribble image VGW Scribble: Customer AbuseWe’ve all heard the grumblings about mistreatment at the hands of game publishers.  Be it copy protection schemes, over-zealous franchise release schedules, or the nickel-and-diming of downloadable game content, we gamers always have something to complain about (#firstworldproblems).

Armed only with sarcasm and crappy stick-figure drawings, VGW’s Kristen Maxwell takes on some of the gaming industry’s latest offenders in this rant-tastic episode of Scribble.

Missed our debut episode? Watch it here

About Kristen Maxwell

Kristen is a dormant volcano of creative awesomeness. One of these days he is going to erupt into a giant explosion of compelling audio-visual masterpieces. Until that day, he bides his time as a floundering father of two boys, an insular geek, and a purveyor of crudely fabricated multimedia experiences. Kris contributes regularly through the “Prattle” podcast, as well as the animated feature, “Scribble.”

Comments

  1. Anonymous says:

    The constant online connection can be a real problem. I remember playing a Ubisoft game a few years back, Settlers something or other, and there were way too many times when I was unable to play the *single player* campaign because the “servers were down.” Yeeeeeaaaaaaah. That’s a great system. 

  2. Just goes to show that developers just don’t give a shit about us customers anymore. Not enough to give us good games, and not even enough to give us full crappy games. They’re getting too big for their britches, and I’m really just hoping for a meltdown of all video games, we need to start over as a niche hobby again.

  3. Everything in this video is true, yet if you want to see the biggest load of morons ever, who claim to be gamers but aren’t (Hurting the gaming industry instantly excludes you from titling your self a “Gamer”), visit Kotaku, people were DEFENDING Capcom doing the 1 save thing, DEFENDING Blizzard forcing an internet connection..

    Me? I only purchase from companies that don’t treat me like shit, Valve and a few others, I always buy a Collector’s Edition if I can.

    For everything else, there is ThePirateBay.

  4. I am one of the people in the “vast majority of the country without broadband”. We have WildBlue Satellite Internet, which barely gets over 100kbps on a GOOD day, is horribly latent, and has usage caps. I already miss out on all the fun to be had with Xbox LIVE multiplayer and voice chat, and some especially large DLC files are out of my reach (stuff like RB3 DLC is small sized, and fine). I miss out on console’s abilities to have Netflix Streaming, and the ability to download TV shows or use Zune Pass efficiently. But I get by without all of this- it’s all OPTIONAL.

    The day when all games MUST be played with an online connection is the day that I venture off to find a new hobby. Games were just as fun back in the N64 and PSX days, when developers didn’t go chasing the “USED GAME DEMONS!” and crippling games for a few more dollars.

    • SIDENOTE: And I really like these scribbles features. I’d like to see more of these ^_^

    • Moribund Cadaver says:

      Oddly enough, I used to be on wildblue satellite too. It sucked, but it wasn’t gaming’s fault. It’s no good for gaming. Period. Or much of anything else. Sometimes, people cannot accept the situation they’re in. I got over the fact that I wasn’t going to be playing games with online features or using games that required a net connection period. You’re not entitled to game companies making sure every single person can play a game the exact same way as everyone else, regardless of whether you’re in an exceptionally bad position to e playing games at the moment.

  5. Moribund Cadaver says:

    the “just play another game where you click on things” argument doesn’t work with Diablo. People want Diablo because it’s actually a good game, and clones in the genre have never managed to really beat it. The content in Diablo III so far, looks as if it will essentially come in and take charge of the genre once more.

    It’s similar to a flawed argument back during fanboy wars between PS3 and Xbox 360. Plenty of fanboys said “you’re a tool if you support Microsoft! Just buy another console and play shooters on it, they’re all the same!” Which is of course, false. People bought an Xbox because they wanted Halo, and Halo was objectively better than any alternative on another platform.

    Blizzard knows they can get some of their way with Diablo III because it will be an objectively better game than what you can find elsewhere. Same deal with Starcraft II. SC is the standard bearer, so for all people bitched and moaned about lanplay, they bought it anyway. Not because they wanted the Blizzard name on the box. But because it was Starcraft. You go where the good games are.

    If there was another hack-n-slash RPG coming out or already out that was every bit as good as Diablo III may likely be or better, it’d be a more sound argument to say people are hypocrites for buying the Blizzard product but complaining about business practices. You mis-characterize what Blizzard is “saying” with Diablo III – they’re not saying “if you like single player games this isn’t for you”. I do not entirely agree with their strategy, and strongly disagree with certain elements such as region locking Starcraft II. But in the case of DIII, there are benefits besides the auction house to housing it within the battlenet 2.0 client. Just as with SC2.

    Honestly, I wouldn’t be surprised if the vast majority of the people complaining about DIII requiring a net connection are busy streaming hundreds of gigs of content on their DSL connection right now and haven’t been without constant internet in five years.

    The argument is more sound with regards to The Mercenaries as it actually is a cheap, quick and dirty cash-in product that isn’t actually a very good game, even on its own merits.

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